Costumes

Top 7 Looks from Outlander: #3 – The Red Dress

Less than a week until the Season 3 premiere so I’m going to have to pick up the pace! WELP. Sorry guys, but I had to focus on my sewing! FINALLY finished my first pair of stays, and can’t wait to share them with a post soon. If you’re just jumping in, here’s my ranking of the Top 7 Looks from Outlander Season 2:

1. 1740’s Dior Bar Suit {Modified Riding Habit}

2. Emerald Brocade Robe à la Piemontaise

3. The Red Dress {Modified Robe de Cour}

4. Raspberry dupioni caraco and lavender petticoat

5. Mocha 1950’s Versailles Garden Party {Modified Redingote}

6. Citrine Robe a l’Anglaise

7. Sapphire Robe Volante with lace stomacher

Screencap from Outlander S2e2

Claire’s famous Red Dress is one of the few garments from the book that needed to be shown on the show, and certainly one that fans have been aching to see brought to life. I already talked a bit about it in this post, but this is an original design that riffs on the Robe de Cour, the most formal gown worn in Europe during the 18th century.

Terry Dresbach has repeatedly said that she does not base her costumes purely on descriptions from the books, and I think that’s the whole point of having a costume designer. They can create a visual language that provides the time, place and mood. Not all authors are good at writing about what their characters are wearing, anyways. On the flip side, sometimes veering from the book is a no-no. Hermione’s dress should have been BLUE, and I don’t give a crap what Emma Watson likes to wear!

Thank you to people with ample time to photoshop who have remedied this situation.

hermione-yule-ball-blue
via Pinterest
giphy (2)
Never thought I’d combine my love of Harry Potter & Snatch 😉

Film and TV productions that attempt “modern historical” are often the result of a combination of ‘the powers that be’ deciding that viewers don’t think historical clothing is sexy or relateable and/or a limited budget. So you might end up with the hot mess that is Reign.

Reign girls
Reign ladies-in-waiting, wearing their best Anthropologie-does-Renn-Faire looks. Blowouts and Coachella headgear, why not!

I should note that I’ve never even watched this show, but Netflix keeps trying to suggest it to me. A show about teenage Mary Stuart, aka future Mary, Queen of Scots, sounds amazing, but alas I couldn’t get past what I saw in the commercials. I was obsessed with Cate Blanchett in Elizabeth when I was in high school, so assuming that they had to do this Gossip Girl/Renn Faire mashup to attract teens is a real lowest-common-denominator bummer.  But back to the Red Dress!

outlander-starz-reddress-versailles

Decidedly not a bummer! Terry Dresbach was tasked with creating a dress that results in a fan favorite Jamie quote, moves the plot, and looks like something that Claire would have designed with her mantua-maker. Claire is very much a modern woman who bristles at the norms and customs of the 18th century (tbh the 20th century too!) and it’s reflected in her minimalist, elegant clothing. Claire suffers no fools—or frou-frou! Louise on the other hand is the picture of French rococo, full of pastel jacquards, frothy ribbons, and coquettish charms. Claire is dressed in deep jewel tones that are either unadorned or given unusual details to have her be just a hair off. Again, she’s a time-traveler and the lead so it’s a good design choice.

Ruby red, plus emerald, garnet. tanzanite, citrine, and amethyst

The Red Dress is modern historical done right—you can see the elements of the 18th century without being thrown off by the anachronistic twists. So let’s break down the modern and the historical aspects of the design.

There’s a lot of 1950’s influence in this dress, much like the Dior Suit. The shade of red immediately brought to mind the famous Revlon lipstick Cherries in the Snow, which they have continued to make since it came out in 1952. The lipstick and matching nail polish were bestsellers, and probably what your grandmother or great aunt was wearing in those old black and white photos you love. This va-va-voom ad from 1953 with model Dorian Leigh certainly doesn’t require you to read between the lines!

Revlon 1953 ad for Cherries in the Snow
“Who knows the black lace thoughts you think while shopping in a gingham frock?”
red-dress-terrydresbach
Inspiration board from Terry Dresbach’s blog
outlander_s2e2_120601
…for a nip slip.

The plunging neckline, however—can we still call it that when it’s nowhere near the neck? The boobline?-—is totally 2016. Obviously this a dress for the bold (although amazingly less NSFW than the King’s mistress OUCHIES) so if you’re doing a cosplay version all I can say is werk werk werk werk werk. Also, don’t lean over 😜

Of course, if you make the Red Dress you can adjust the neckline to suit your comfort level. Just sew up the center front seam until you’ve got a level of décolletage you won’t regret later. If you want to be more modest AND historically accurate, then sew it completely closed and bring on the lace and bling. You could also tone down the boob-tasticness by adding a lace tucker or a chiffon ruffle like Claire’s purple dress, which looks like it was drafted from the same pattern. Hey, we can’t all be former Victoria Secret models like Ms. Balfe! I’ve always been a rectangle in those magazine “what shape are you?” quizzes so I’m forever Team Modest Bosom.

On the historical side this gown has many elements of the Robe de Cour, or “court dress.” Another name for this style of dress is grand habit (“full dress”), but as the fashions of the French court carried to other countries it simply became the dress to be worn in the presence of royalty. In English it was called a stiff-bodied gown. Compare Claire’s dress to these two ruby Robes de Cour worn by royals in the mid-late 18th century.

Henriette-red-robe-violadegamba
Henriette of France, youngest of Louis XV’s twin daughters. Love that she played the viola de gamba!

This gorgeous scarlet red and gold brocade robe de cour is worn by Louis XV’s daughter Henriette, the younger of his twin daughters born in 1727. That date sounded way too early to me, but it turns out Louis XV was married at 15, and “finally” fathered an heir (and a spare) at the ripe old age of 17! So if you do the math, Louis XV has 18 year old daughters AND a 16 year old married son at the time of Bonnie Prince Charlie’s campaign. Blergh.

Maria Amalia of Habsburg Lorraina Parma
Archduchess Maria Amalia c.1765. One of Empress Maria Theresa’s 11 daughters, and thus older sister to Marie Antoinette.
Cherry Satin Robe de Cour from Gallerie des modes
“Habit de cour de satin cerise” fashion plate from Gallerie des Modes, 1778.

These are both later Robes de Cour, as Maria Amalia was born in 1746 shortly before the Battle of Culloden, and the print is from 1778. However, the dress style has barely changed: same low, off-the-shoulder bodice that laces up the back, layered lace sleeves, ornate stomacher, and petticoat with large panniers. The lace sleeves are detachable, but I’m not sure if they were tacked onto the chemise or the bodice. This cloth-of-gold bodice was worn by Lady Mary Douglas at the coronation of George III. There’s a cool FIDM blog post about how they took to the hospital to be x-rayed and examine all the layers of the only surviving English “stiff-bodied gown” without damaging it. It looks like the strip of ivory silk is where the lace sleeves would have been attached.

Gold robe de cour bodice
Gold robe de cour bodice worn by Lady Mary Douglas, 1761. FIDM Helen Larson Collection.

The court bodice was fully boned, laced up the back, and many also had tabs, so it was basically a bodice-stays hybrid. No stays were worn underneath the robe de cour, so Terry Dresbach took that idea and ran with it.

outlander-lacma-reddress-front
Photos from the Outlander exhibit at the Paley Center via TerryDresbach.com
outlander-lacma-reddress-back
Back lacing with modesty panel, although perhaps a misnomer here…

There are usually bows or ribbon decoration at the elbow, which is interpreted very simply on Claire’s gown. You can see a piped edge along the bodice which is sitting on top of a cartridge-pleated skirt, just like on the Emerald Robe à la Piemontaise. The photo also shows where the center inverted box pleat ends.

Screenshot_2016-04-29-20-31-33-1
Close up on the ribbon detail and the skirt’s accordion pleats.

The hem length is high ankle, and that isn’t really fashionable until the last quarter of the century, and then only for less formal dresses. Even when the empire waist came into fashion, the Robe de Cour skirt still grazes the floor with wide panniers (yeah, it’s not sexy look). But the shorter hem modernizes Claire’s dress and helps set the dress apart in a crowd. Plus, gotta show off your custom shoes! Similar strap-happy heels on the Pinterest board.

Outlander S2 Shoes for the red dress.

In addition the amazing dress, this episode also gave us one of my fave Outlander memes.

In Jamie’s defense, he did give Claire a heads up. “I said I was a virgin, not a monk.” Haha!

Jamie's reaction to Annelise S2e2
AWKWARD

Sad face for pretty Annelise wearing this dull frock so she doesn’t steal the spotlight from Claire. Don’t feel too bad, though because she gets the lovely raspberry caraco and lavender petticoat outfit that we’ll cover next!

How to Make It

I’m going to assume that anyone making this gown, or a historically accurate version, has a pretty fancy party to attend. I haven’t tackled panniers or cartridge pleating yet, but if you’ve made stays or another type of boned bodice before this project is very doable. Practice crab-walking sideways through doors to see if this dress is for you 😉

Claire red dress profile

Type: Original design {Modified Robe de Cour}

HA Rating: 6/10
(It would turn heads, but you wouldn’t be immediately be thrown in gaol as a time-traveling witch like showing up in Forever 21)

Est. Yardage:
Bodice and petticoat: 10- 15 yds (Terry Dresbach said she needed 15 yds, but the American Duchess pattern calls for 8.5 yds)

Materials:
Silk duchesse satin or charmeuse
Self trim or matching satin ribbon and chiffon for neckline edge

Patterns:
The front-runner is definitely the Simplicity x American Duchess pattern, including Bodice, accordion-pleated skirt, and panniers– Simplicity-American Duchess 8411

Undergarments:
Paniers/Side Hoops: Simplicity-American Duchess 8411
Dreamstress Panier-Along tutorial
Stays and a Shift/Chemise aren’t necessary for this dress, but you’ll need a cotton petticoat so the panniers don’t make the skirt look lumpy.

Accessories:

Confidence or a couple glasses of wine or both
Garnet or ruby earrings
Red satin heels (modern or rococo)
Hair piece to help give volume on top and hair powder (to be historically accurate)

 

Up Next: #4, Raspberry Caraco and Lavender Petticoat!

 

Sources:

Helpful posts from the Dreamstress and American Duchess

Patterns of Fashion and other books on the Recommended Reading list

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